Aims of the strategy

This is a project to improve the public network of electric vehicle charge points in the Dorset Council area for use by staff, residents and visitors;  to encourage electric vehicle ownership and to meet future needs which is anticipated to grow as electric vehicle car ownership increases.

A phased approach is being taken starting with the installation of EVCPs in some of Dorset Council owned public facing car parks. Further phases will focus on on-street EVCPs and other locations.

Intended outcomes:

  • make the use of electric vehicles in Dorset easier and more practical with more charging points available
  • increase electric vehicle ownership in Dorset
  • reduce carbon emissions to help address the climate emergency
  • improve air quality - linked to public health benefits
  • address national and local expectations regarding electric vehicle ownership

Context to the proposal

In May 2019 Dorset Council declared a climate and ecological emergency in response to the global threat posed by climate change and recognition that Dorset Council has a responsibility to play its part in helping tackle this global problem while we still have time to make a difference. 

Due to a dependency on fossil fuels the transport sector is a major contributor of carbon emissions (CO2). Transport is the single biggest contributor to our carbon footprint.  In 2017 transport was responsible for 44 percent of CO2 emissions (an estimated 765 kilotons of CO2e) in Dorset. To reach zero carbon, fossil fuel use in the transport sector will need to be eliminated. 

Part of the overall solution is switching vehicles that use low carbon fuels or energy sources.  In 2019 only 0.5 percent (1,313 vehicles) of all cars and light goods vehicles registered in the Dorset Council area were Ultra-Low Emission Vehicles (ULEVs).  Making all 280,000 vehicles registered in Dorset zero carbon emissions is a big challenge.  

Electric has become the leading ultra-low carbon vehicle technology for passenger cars and light goods vehicles. To support the move to electric vehicles in both the Dorset Council fleet and amongst residents, businesses and visitors there will need to be an increase in the provision of charging points.

By April 2020 the number of publicly available electric vehicle charging points in Dorset had reached 80 devices, 21 per 100,000 population. This is lower than the national average of 27 charge points per 100,000 population. There is a risk that Dorset residents will be disadvantaged by not having sufficient access to a public charging point network unless action is taken now to address this shortcoming. Expanding the charging network across Dorset will require significant action from both public and private sectors. A council planned programme of charge point installations commencing in 2020 will expand the public off-street electric vehicle charging network significantly. 

Improvements to the electric vehicle charge point network has been identified in the following plans and work streams:

Both on-street and off-street EVCP provision are covered in this EqIA. However, at this time there is a focus on the off-street delivery. This is because off-street charging is currently considered to have the biggest impact on the residents, workforce and visitors of Dorset. It is also the part of the project that will be soonest delivered.  Off-street EVCPs will be located initially in Dorset Council owned public facing car parks. Due to a number of complex issues involved in the delivery of on-street charging points, further research is required to identify the best approach to delivery.

This EqIA is focussed on the installation of charge points rather than the electric vehicles.

Intelligence and communication

Data, information, evidence and research and how it was used to influence the decision making process

Multiple sources of data and information have been used to inform the development of our approach to electric vehicle charging points. These are summarised below. 

The Department for Transport provides numerous statistical datasets, many available at national, regional and local authority level. The vehicle licencing collection includes ultra-low emission vehicle statistics at local authority level 

The Energy Savings Trust provides practical electric vehicle charging advice to local authorities. 

Local data sources used include: 

  • consultation with town, parish and Dorset Council councillors
  • consultation with various local groups who represent, or whose members represent, those with protected characteristics eg Age Concern, local disability access groups
  • two electric vehicle charging points demand studies (2011 and 2019) completed by the research and information team
  • Joju - the EVCP supplier selected under the terms of the Central Southern framework agreement
  • Dorset Council Statistics
  • electric vehicle charge point data from existing rapid charger sites: Bridport, Dorchester, Lyme Regis, Weymouth, and Wimborne
  • ZapMap - a UK-wide map of charging point
  • electric vehicle user forums
  • Business Travel Network – a business focussed transport organisation funded by Dorset Council and BCP. 

General enquiries from residents and visitors are received via emails to ElectricVehicles@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk  and via the customer services team. The electric vehicle chargepoint webpage provides useful information and links for those seeking information on charging an electric vehicle in Dorset.

This data showed an increasing need for electric vehicle charging points across Dorset. 

The Department for Transport statistical data shows that on average the number of plug-in electric cars and light good vehicles has increased by 55 percent per annum in Dorset over the last 5 years. Government have consulted on introducing a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars in 2035 and predict rapid growth in the electric vehicle market as people switch to low emission vehicles. Demand for electric vehicle charging is therefore also increasing. 

The Energy Savings Trust estimate that there could be between 15.6 million and 19.4 million electric cars in the UK by 2035, between 47% and 59% of all cars on the road. 

Energy Savings Trust forecasts for the uptake of electric cars in the UK, based on the end of sale of new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars by 2035.

Electric cars as a percentage of new car sales

Electric cars as a percentage of new cars
Year Lower uptake scenario Higher update scenario
2010

0%

0%

2015

1%

1%

2020

5%

10%

2025

28%

40%

2030

50%

70%

2035

100%

100%

Total number of electric cars in the UK (cumulative)

Total number of cars in the UK cumulative
Year Lower uptake scenario Higher uptake scenario
2010

252

-

2015

50,234

-

2020

376,999

486,999

2025

2,411,747

3,566,747

2030

6,893,655

9,918,655

2035

15,611,999

19,406,999

Electric cars as a proportion of all cars

Electric cars as a proportion of all cars
Year Lower uptake scenario Higher uptake scenario
2010

0%

0%

2015

0%

0%

2020

1%

1%

2025

7%

11%

2030

21%

30%

2035

47%

59%

Through webinars organised by the Energy Savings Trust and other local authority contacts, we have drawn on the experience, knowledge and best practice that exists in the UK. 

Locally a variety of data, information and guidance has been gathered: 

  • consultation with town, parish and Dorset Council councillors has helped identify locations where there is local support
  • impacts of the installation of charge points identified by local groups with protected characteristics have been incorporated into part 4 of this EqIA
  • electric vehicle charging points demand studies in 2011 and 2019 identified possible areas where urban households without off-street parking should be targeted to encourage electric car uptake. 
  • Joju have conducted a desktop feasibility study to understand which Dorset Council car parks are suitable to have electric vehicle charging points
  • Dorset Council car park and permit data, as well as the Department for Transport vehicle statistics, was used to determine potential demand and suitability of all Council owned car parks
  • Dorset Council statistics along with DfT statistics provided information around dwelling types, which affect the level of parking provision. Generally, at a national level in England, houses and bungalows were much more likely to have garages than flats (48% compared with 9%), however, social sector houses or bungalows were less likely to have garages (7%) than private sector flats (13%)
  • parking provision was also strongly related to dwelling location. For example, 56% of homes in rural areas had a garage compared with 44% in suburban and just 14% in city and urban areas. In both the private and social sectors, parking provision worsened as building density increased
  • we need to be mindful that not all households own a vehicle

This leads us to conclude that the majority of residences in the Dorset Council area have access to off road parking and will be able to make provision for electric vehicle charge points at home. We will need to do further research to identify where there is no ability to charge a vehicle at or close to home. 

  • electric vehicle charge point data from existing rapid (five sites: Bridport, Dorchester, Lyme Regis, Weymouth, and Wimborne) charger reports demonstrate strong and growing demand for charging points
  • ZapMap data has helped identify where the private sector has already installed charge points and avoids public investment in areas where there is already adequate supply 
  • electric vehicle user forums – used as informal guidance 
  • business travel network events and engagement provides workplace vehicle charging information as well as information provided by guest speakers about the road to a zero-carbon future and how it can be achieved from a business perspective

Other local authority experiences have revealed the installation of on-street EVCPs brings with it its own complexities. Issues such as trailing cables across the footway requires further guidance regarding general safety in accordance with the Highways Act 1980. This has led Dorset Council to focus on the delivery of off street EVCP installation at this time rather than on-street. 

We have identified through consultation with local disability access groups that parking bays need to be wide enough to accommodate blue badge holders and families (parent/child). As such there will be two EVCPs across a minimum of three standard parking bays making them the same size as a standard disabled parking bay. 

There are issues identified around smart phone technology needed to use some electric vehicles charge points – e.g. not everyone has the digital skills or is comfortable with technology or has a mobile phone.As such the supplier will provide alternative access. 

Further information needed to help inform this proposal

No further information is required for off-street parking charge points. 

But further information is needed to help inform our on-street charging point approach, including:

  • legal guidance for on-street charge points regarding trailing cables across footways
  • locations where there are households which do not have the ability to install an electric vehicle charge point at home or have access to an EVCP in the near vicinity of their home
  • suggestions for electric vehicle charge point locations recorded, ideally on a map, to further identify collective need. This will be achieved through the launch of an online webform which has just gone live (July 2020) to enable the public to suggest locations for new electric vehicle charging points and will help inform the project in future

Engagement and consultation

Engagement or consultation has taken place as part of this EQIA

Consultation with town, parish and Dorset Council councillors regarding locations took place in Summer 2019.

Consultation with local protected characteristic groups took place in July/August 2020.

Feedback

Unitary, town and parish councillors will be updated via newsletters or individually as necessary. 

We will feedback to representatives of the protected characteristic groups via a ‘you said, we did’ summary as an email and possibly on our website which will be updated as the project progresses.

Assessment 

Impacts     

impacts table
Impacts on who or what  Effect  Details  
 Age Positive/negative 
  • providing more publicly available electric vehicle charge points will enable greater electric vehicle ownership, which in turn will reduce emissions and improve air quality - positive 
  • the consultation with Age Concern identified that there could be difficulties for the elderly around plugging in the cables regarding dexterity and strength – negative
  • there is potentially a negative impact for on street electric vehicle charge points as trailing cables could be a trip hazard. This would need to be considered in subsequent EqIAs specific to on-street installation projects – negative
  • less noise pollution will make things more ambiently pleasant – positive
  • children in pushchairs and at walking height to exhausts could be exposed to less pollutants e.g. diesel particulates causing respiratory conditions – positive
Disability: (including physical, mental, sensory and progressive conditions)  Positive/negative
  • positive for those with conditions that affect breathing as air quality is improved - positive 
  • more electric vehicles will mean less noise pollution making things more ambiently pleasant but could be problematic for those who use sound for safety - positive
  • less noise pollution will make things more ambiently pleasant and might have a positive impact on those with sensory issues around sound - positive 
  • trailing cables could be an issue, especially at narrow pinch points
  • this could be particularly problematic for those with sight or mobility issues, or who need accompanying. can. They could also have a negative impact regarding safety for wheelchair and mobility scooter users as, even with cable protectors, they will make the road surface uneven which could encourage people to walk around these potential obstacles into traffic flow areas – negative
  • restricted width and uneven road surfaces could also make things more difficult for those accompanied by carers and encourage people to walk around these potential obstacles into traffic flow areas - negative
  • technology could be difficult for those with learning disabilities or sight impairment for example, difficulties with reading how to use the charging point – negative. 
  • plugging in/unplugging charging cables could be difficult for those with upper mobility issues – negative
Gender reassignment and  gender identity / race and ethnicity / religion or belief / sexual orientation / sex / marriage or civil partnership /armed forces communities   Neutral
  • We don’t anticipate at this time this project will have an impact on these protected characteristics
Pregnancy and maternity:  Positive/negative
  • providing more publicly available electric vehicle charge points will enable greater EV ownership, which in turn will reduce emissions and improve air quality impacting on health during pregnancy – positive
  • trailing cables could be an issue, especially at narrow pinch points. This could encourage people to walk around these potential obstacles into traffic flow areas. This could be problematic when pushing a pram/pushchair or if there are mobility difficulties caused by pregnancy – negative
  • the parking bays for off-street parking will be wider than a standard bay, giving easier access in and out of the vehicle – positive
 Carers Positive/negative
  • Trailing cables could be an issue, especially at narrow pinch points. This could encourage people to walk around these potential obstacles into traffic flow areas. 
  • The parking bays for off-street parking will be wider than a standard bay, the same width as a disabled parking bay, giving easier access in and out of the vehicle. 
Rural isolation   Unclear/positive
  • whilst priority for installation of electric vehicle charge points is focussed on where population is denser, household car ownership is high in rural areas due to lack of alternatives. It is assumed that the majority of properties will have access to their own off-street parking facilities. We do not have a specific data set for Dorset as mentioned previously. This will be addressed through further research – unclear. 
  • residents of rural areas will still be able to benefit from accessing charging in the larger settlements and possibly at workplaces – positive. 
Single parent families:  Neutral/Negative
  • trailing cables could be an issue, especially at narrow pinch points. This could encourage people to walk around these potential obstacles into traffic flow areas – negative
  • the parking bays for off-street parking will be wider than a standard bay, giving easier access in and out of the vehicle – positive. 
Social and economic deprivation:  Positive/Neutral
  • As the majority of social deprivation occurs within towns. By providing more publicly available electric vehicle charge points there will be greater electric vehicles ownership, which in turn will reduce emissions and improve air quality – positive
  • Less noise pollution will also make things more ambiently pleasant – positive
  • It should be noted that this EqIA is focussed on the charge points, not the vehicles themselves so does not address the potential inequality of affordability of car ownership. 
impact description table
Type of impact Details of type of impact
Positive Impact 

the proposal eliminates discrimination, advances equality of opportunity and/or fosters good relations with protected groups.

Negative Impact 

Protected characteristic group(s) could be disadvantaged or discriminated against

Neutral Impact 

No change/ no assessed significant impact of protected characteristic groups

Unclear 

Not enough data/evidence has been collected to make an informed decision.

Action Plan

action plan table
Issue Action to be taken Person(s) responsible Date to be completed by

How would people with learning difficulties navigate user interface?

 

  • speak with supplier and local groups that represent, or whose members represent, those with protected characteristics
  • submit comments from the consultations with local groups that represent, or whose members represent, those with protected characteristics such as Age concern and local disability access groups (with their permission) to the supplier

Kelly Flynn

Owen Clark

Before supplier gets on site – anticipated Autumn/Winter 2020

How would those with upper mobility issues manage plugging into and unplugging from the electric vehicle charge points?

  • speak with supplier and local groups that represent, or whose members represent, those with protected characteristics. 
  • submit comments from the consultations with local groups that represent, or whose members represent, those with protected characteristics such as Age concern and local disability access groups (with their permission) to the supplier

Kelly Flynn

Owen Clark

Before supplier gets on site – anticipated Autumn/Winter 2020

There is potentially a negative impact for the elderly, those who have mobility issues, carers and parents with trailing cables, especially at narrow pinch points. This could encourage people to walk around these potential obstacles into traffic flow areas.

 

  • seek advice from Legal
  • speak with disability groups
  • consult with other local authorities to see what they’re doing
  • review EqIA following consultations with disability groups
  • there is potentially that there will be national legislation or a technological work-round in the future that addresses this matter

Helen Jackson

Kelly Flynn

Before the on-street element of the project becomes a priority.

The on-street phase of this project becomes a priority.

Review EqIA to ensure it is still fit for purpose

Project Lead

 

 

To be confirmed

Who has agreed the EqIA?

agreement table
Role Name Date
Officer completing this EqIA

Kelly Flynn

10/06/2020

Equality Lead

Susan Ward-Rice

26/08/2020

Equality & Diversity Action Group Chair

Pete Bartlett

26/08/2020

 

Diversity and Inclusion Officer - Dorset Council

Name: Susan Ward-Rice
Email: susan.ward-rice@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk
Tel: 01305 224368
Full contact details

 

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