If you find daily tasks hard, you can get help.

This might be something to help you do things yourself: equipment; technology or changes to your home. Or it might be care – from people you know, the community and professionals.

Take each step in this checklist. At step 4, we look at what can meet your needs so you can live independently.

1. Find out what simple changes can help you do things

If you find doing daily tasks hard, many things can help you look after yourself. Small changes at home, equipment and technology can help you cook or wash.

Find out how to make living at home easier, safer, and more comfortable. Or speak to our team on 01305 221 016 about what could help. It could be an extra stairs handrail or a rail to hold in the shower.

2. Get money that could be there for you to get care

If you need help with things like washing and dressing, you could qualify for a benefit. This money could get a professional to help you do things for a couple of hours a week.

Find out if you can get some financial help to get some care.

And find a carer to help for a couple of hours a week.

3. Make it easier for people you know to care for you

Someone you know like a friend, neighbour or family member might help you to do things. Your carer can get support and help to have breaks – and you can go out.

Check what financial help they can get and who could help you both.

4. Ask us to look at what care and support you need

If you made changes at home and get some support, you might still be struggling. If so, ask our team to carry out a care needs assessment.

There is a wait for this. And most people pay at least something for their care. So, if we find you qualify for care, we then work out exactly how much you pay towards care.

To get us to look at your care needs, call our team on 01305 221 016. Say what you have already tried.

If you are thinking about getting us to look at your care needs, get free advice on what happens from:

  • The Family Rights Group on 0808 801 0366
  • Independent Age on 0800 055 6112
  • Age UK on 0800 055 6112

5. Tell us about how you find daily tasks

We will talk to you about what things you can do for yourself, things you need help with and any support you have.

And we will advise you about any extra help you need in a support plan.

Find out what sorts of questions we will ask when we look at your care needs in this Which? guide.

6. What happens after we look at your care needs

If we find you do not qualify for care

We will still give you advice and information on how you could do things differently.

If we find you do qualify for care

You will get a copy of your support plan. This says what support you need to stay independent. It also says how much this may cost.

Next, we will need to look at evidence of your money and your costs. Find out how we work out what you will pay towards your care. 

7. Find out the ways you can get any extra care you need

You have different ways to find any extra care your support plan says is needed.

You could have more choice and make the money go further by employing a carer yourself.

If this might work for you, ask us about getting the money for your care as a direct payment. Find out about direct payments.

Get money to help with your care

If someone needs to look after you because of a disability or ill-health, you may have the right to financial help. And the person you know who cares for you could get financial help too.

Find out what benefits and discounts you might qualify for, and how to claim.

Get financial help for your care

If you need help with things like washing and dressing, you might qualify for financial help.

If you are 66 or older, you might qualify for the Attendance Allowance. If you are under 66, you might qualify for the Personal Independence Payment, PIP.

To find out more and claim by:

Get financial help for care from someone you know

If somebody cares for you without being paid for it, they could get a benefit. They can get the Carer's Allowance if:

  1. They care for you for 35 hours a week or more

and

  1. You get a benefit like the Attendance Allowance or Personal Independence Payment (it must be the ‘daily living' part)

Make sure it will not mean you get less in benefits for having a severe disability.

Find out more and claim by:

Top up the money you have coming in

Get extra money to help with your living costs.

If you are 66 or older and do not have much money coming in, you might be able to get Pension Credit.

If you need help paying your rent, you might qualify for Housing benefit. You could get this if you are on Pension Credit. Or, if you are of working age, you might qualify for Universal Credit instead.

Find out more about what you can claim:

Pay less for your bills

If you are on a low income and rely on benefits, you could pay less for some bills and costs. To find out more and claim:

Get extra help if you do not have enough food

You can get extra help to make sure you eat enough.

Find out how to get help on our guide to getting helping if you do not have enough food.

Get more advice on benefits

If you are unsure what benefits you can get, get free advice. You can:

Get help for someone you know to care for you

Someone you know like a friend, neighbour or family member might help you to do things. Your carer can get support and help to have breaks – and you can go out.

See if somebody who cares for you can get financial help

Find out if someone who cares for you is able to get financial help.

You can:

Find a professional to help someone who cares for you

If someone you know cares for you, you can both get help to make it easier.

You can:

Get a break for someone who cares for you

If someone you know cares for you, you can get someone to sit with you while they go out for a bit. Find out if you qualify for our short breaks service.

The person who cares for you needs to:

Get a home right for you, with care if you need

If you have a disability or illness, moving home might let you look after yourself. Or you can get your own home where there is care or support day and night.

Move home to live more independently with a disability

You can think about moving instead of adapting your home for your disability or health condition. It can be a way for you to more easily look after yourself.

Apply for council social housing to meet your needs. Or buy or rent a home right for you. You can search for homes suitable for wheelchair users, like a bungalow.

If your home is not suitable for you:

Move to a home with care or support for your disability or illness

If you need more support to stay independent, you can get this in a new home.

You can have your own home in a community with help on hand 24 hours a day with supported housing. You are eligible if you qualify for care and support.

Or, if you own your home, a home with support to buy or part-buy (shared ownership) might be for you.

Find out how by:

Get help to move to a home that is right for you

If moving might meet your needs, find out if you can get financial help to move.

You could get a loan to help with moving costs if you get income support or pension credit. Find out if you qualify for a budgeting loan (Gov.uk).

If you get housing benefit or universal credit, you might qualify for help with moving costs or deposit. Find out if Discretionary Housing Payments could help.

And you might get financial help with moving if you are in social housing and have more bedrooms than you need. Find out if you might qualify for a cash incentive:

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