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Coronavirus (COVID-19): updates and advice, including help if you are struggling financially

Your wellbeing when working from home

It is more important than ever to make sure you are looking after you. This section is to remind you to look after your wellbeing when working from home.

Find a wider section of support and information in our wellbeing section of this kit.

Emotional reactions

This can be a worrying time but it’s healthy to accept having an emotional reaction is normal. Your reactions could be:

  • anxiety
  • fear of contagion
  • anger
  • frustration

These reactions are a sign that our body’s natural protective mechanisms have been triggered. Noticing these feelings and accepting that they are normal, rather than attempting to minimise them or deny them, has been shown to make those feelings less prominent in our minds.

Staying in contact

Staying at home for a prolonged period can be difficult, frustrating and lonely and you or other household members may feel low. Stay connected with friends and family online. If you’re stuck indoors, you can still video call your mum, play FIFA with your mates or give your nan a call.

There are also a number of video apps that you can download to host virtual social events with your pals, so that your weekly Friday night drink at the pub can live on in some capacity.

Now is the perfect time to reach out to help other people. Use this opportunity to connect with those you haven’t spoken to in a while and check in with people that may need it. You might be stuck indoors but the virtual world can be your oyster.

Ask for help if you need it

Don’t be afraid to ask for help, it’s totally normal to feel a little overwhelmed or upset with what’s going on.

Social distancing doesn’t mean emotional distancing, so pick up the phone and reach out to the people in your life. Rather than trying to deal with this alone, it might help to seek the support of a health professional either within your organisation or externally. Speak to your HR adviser to find out more.

Activity ideas

Think about things you can do during your time at home. Keep busy with activities such as:

  • cooking
  • reading
  • online learning
  • watching films

If you feel well enough you can take part in light exercise within your home or garden.

Many people find it helpful to remind themselves why what they're doing is so important. By staying home, you’re protecting the lives of others, as well as making sure the NHS does not get overwhelmed.

When working at home, take time out for you during the day. You could:

Remember to switch off

Don’t feel like you need to follow the news for 24 hours a day, because it might do more harm than good. Maybe check in with the news at the beginning and end of your ‘usual’ working day so that you’re up to date, but not obsessing over every breaking story. There is also a lot of misinformation on social media, so stick to the trusted news providers.

And if you do come across a positive story that makes you chuckle, share it with your friends and family.

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